icon
skip to content

Rated 4.8 on Trustpilot

FREE Next Day Delivery on orders over £30

100% no fuss 30 day money-back guarantee

How to Make a Constipated Dog Poop Quickly

How to Make a Constipated Dog Poop Quickly

Dogs are susceptible to constipation for a variety of reasons, including diet, lack of exercise, and dehydration. When a dog is constipated, they will exhibit dog constipation symptoms, such as that he will have trouble passing stool, which can be painful and lead to other health problems. Fortunately, there are ways to help a constipated dog poop quickly.

  1. If your dog is constipated, try giving them a small amount of water or Pedialyte to help them poop
  2. If that doesn't work, you can try gently massaging their stomach or back
  3. If they're still having trouble pooping, you can give them an enema or put a little petroleum jelly on their anus
  4. Monitor your dog's diet - make sure they're getting enough fiber and moisture
  5. More exercise: Take them for frequent walks to help stimulate their bowels
  6. If all else fails, take them to the vet for help

No dog owner wants to see their furry friend suffer, least of all from constipation. If your dog is backed up and having trouble passing stool, there are a few things you can do at home to help ease their discomfort and get things moving again. Here are some tips on how to make a constipated dog poop quickly.

Step One: Understand the Causes of Dog Constipation

There are many different reasons for dog constipation, from a lack of fiber in their diet to dehydration. Most often, it is simply due to your dog's anatomy. Smaller dogs or dogs with shorter rectums may be more prone to developing difficulty passing stool.

Another common cause is the ingestion of foreign objects or hairballs, which can block the intestines. If your dog has arthritis or structural issues like hip dysplasia, they may also have difficulty squatting to defecate properly, leading to constipation.

Dogs can become constipated for a variety of reasons, including diet, lack of exercise, and dehydration. It's important to understand the causes of constipation in dogs so that you can help your pet feel better. Some common causes of constipation in dogs include:

Diet:

Dogs who don't eat enough fiber or moisture can become constipated. Make sure your dog is getting enough healthy foods like fruits and vegetables, and give them plenty of water to drink. Of course, eating non-food items will cause dogs constipation. Try replacing his dry food with wet food.

Lack of Exercise:

Dogs who don't get enough exercise are more likely to become constipated. Make sure your dog gets plenty of exercises each day to avoid dog constipation.

Dehydration:

Dogs who are dehydrated are more likely to become constipated. Make sure your dog always has access to fresh water.

Step Two: Try Home Remedies First

There are a few things you can try at home for dog constipation before resorting to more drastic measures. Starting with the basics, make sure your dog has easy access to plenty of fresh water at all times and that they are on a well-rounded diet with enough fiber. Buy a can of 100% pure pureed pumpkin in the baking aisle at your grocery store and mix some into your dog's food.

Help your dog drink more water

One of the best ways to help a constipated dog poop quickly is to make sure they're drinking plenty of water. Make sure your dog always has access to fresh water, and try giving them a little more than usual. You can also add ice cubes or cold water to their food to help them stay hydrated.

Feed your dog a high-fiber diet

A high-fiber diet can help a constipated dog poop quickly by adding more bulk to their stool. There are a variety of high-fiber foods you can give your dog, including:

-fresh fruits and vegetables

-whole grain breads and cereals

-oats

-bran

-psyllium husk

Exercise your dog regularly

Exercise is an important part of keeping your dog healthy, and preventing dog constipation.

Make sure your dog gets plenty of exercise each day, either through walks or playtime. This will help stimulate their bowels and make it easier for them to poop.

You can also try adding a teaspoon of olive oil or plain yogurt to their food once a day, which can help lubricate the intestines and make passage easier. For Dogs that eat dry kibble, adding some warm water to their bowl may also help soften stool and make it easier to pass.

If those home remedies don't seem to be doing the trick after a day or two, then it's time to move on to some more aggressive treatments.

Step Three: Give Them a Little Help From Over-the-Counter Products

There are several over-the-counter products available that can help with mild cases of dog constipation. Be sure to follow the dosage instructions on the packaging carefully and always ask your veterinarian before starting any new supplements or medications.

Step Four: Consider More Serious Interventions for Severe Cases of Constipation in Dogs

Administer stool softeners as prescribed by your veterinarian

If your dog is constipated, your veterinarian may prescribe stool softeners to help them poop more easily. Speak to your vet to find out whether there is an underlying cause that could be addressed. Make sure to follow the instructions carefully, and administer the medication as directed. If your dog's constipation doesn't improve after taking stool softeners, please consult your veterinarian for further assistance.

In severe cases of constipation where home remedies and over-the-counter products haven't worked, it's time to talk to your veterinarian about other options. An enema may be necessary to relieve extremely impacted bowels, but this should only be done under veterinary supervision as there is a risk of perforation if not done correctly.

Your vet may also recommend a prescription laxative or stool softener for long-term use if other treatments haven't been successful. During your visit, your veterinarian will perform a physical exam. In very rare cases, medical interventions such as surgery may be necessary to remove the foreign material or obstruction causing constipation or realign the rectum if there is a structural issue preventing proper elimination. 

Why is My Dog Constipated?

There are many possible reasons why your dog may be constipated, including changes to their diet, dehydration, and lack of regular exercise. If you notice that your dog is constipated, it is important to consult a vet so that they can help identify the underlying cause. Some common causes of constipation in dogs include reduced fiber intake and parasites or viruses such as giardia or coccidia. In addition, some medications and gastrointestinal disorders can also contribute to constipation in dogs.

This is an easy fix for most dogs, but some dogs may experience chronic constipation. Be sure to visit your vet if this is the case.

Overall, the key to managing constipation in dogs is identifying the root cause and making any necessary lifestyle changes to help relieve their symptoms. With the right care and treatment, your dog can get back on track quickly and be back to their usual happy selves!

Conclusion: 

Dealing with a constipated dog can be frustrating for both you and your furry friend, but there are luckily some things you can do at home to help ease their discomfort and get them back on track.

If home remedies don't seem to be working after a day or two, speak to your vet about possible over-the-counter treatments or prescription options that may be appropriate for your dog's situation. With patience and some trial and error, you'll find what works best for helping your dog go number two in no time.

FAQs

How do I know if my dog is constipated?

Constipation in dogs can be difficult to diagnose, as there are many different causes. Here are the most common dog constipation symptoms: straining to defecate, producing small amounts of hard stool, reluctance to eat or drink, and obvious discomfort. Some constipated dogs will have a tense, painful abdomen and cry or growl if you press on their stomach or lower back. If you think your dog may be constipated, please consult your veterinarian for diagnosis and treatment.

What can I give my dog to help them poop?

The point is to soften their stool. Never give a dog human laxatives. There are a variety of home remedies you can try for mild constipation. Some helpful tips include adding water or broth to their food, feeding them fresh fruits and vegetables, providing high-fiber foods like whole grains and oats, and exercising them regularly.

You can also try adding a teaspoon of olive oil or plain yogurt to their food once a day until you see them have a normal stool. If those remedies don't seem to be working after a day or two, talk to your veterinarian about over-the-counter treatments or prescription options that may be appropriate for your pet's condition.

As a cost effective alternative to calling the vet, you can use probiotics. Probiotics are beneficial bacteria that help keep the digestive system running smoothly. They are often used to treat constipation in dogs, as they can help soften stool and make it easier to pass. Probiotics can be found in both over-the-counter and prescription medications, and they come in a variety of forms including pills, powders, and liquids. 

If your dog is struggling with constipation, consider probiotics as a possible treatment option. Probiotics are safe and effective for most dogs, and they may provide relief from symptoms such as straining to defecate, producing small amounts of hard stool, reluctance to eat or drink, and obvious discomfort.

Are there any serious consequences of constipation in dogs?

There are a number of potential consequences of constipation in dogs, and these can range from uncomfortable to extremely serious. One possible consequence is an increased risk of gastrointestinal infections.

Because unprocessed stool can be a source for harmful bacteria and parasites, it is important for dogs to eliminate waste regularly in order to prevent these unwanted organisms from spreading. Another potential pitfall of dog constipation is bloating, which happens when gas accumulates in the digestive system due to difficulty passing feces. If left untreated, bloating can become extremely painful and even life-threatening for dogs. See a vet immediately if your dog fails to produce a bowel movement within 48 to 72 hours and they will decide on the appropriate treatment.

Additionally, constipation may make it difficult for dogs to receive effective nutrition through their food, resulting in weight loss and other health problems. Therefore, dog owners should not take constipation lightly, as it could potentially have serious repercussions for their furry friends.

Is There Medication for My Constipated Dog?

If your dog is constipated, you're probably wondering if there's medication that can help. The answer is yes, there are several options available. There are three main types of constipation medication: stool softeners, laxatives, and enemas. 

Stool softeners add moisture to the stool, making it easier to pass. Laxatives, on the other hand, stimulate bowel movements. Enemas add fluid directly into the rectum, which helps soften and move the stool. 

So, how do you know which type of constipation medication is right for your dog? The answer depends on the severity of your dog's constipation and how long they've been dealing with it. If your dog has mild constipation that has only been going on for a day or two, a stool softener may be all they need. However, if your dog has severe constipation or has been dealing with it for an extended period of time, a laxative or enema may be necessary. 

It's always best to talk to your veterinarian before giving your dog any type of medication. They can help you determine the best course of action based on your dog's individual needs.

Previous post Next post

Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published